Thomas Jefferson’s Garden Book

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Growing Oranges on the Nebraska Plains

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U.S. Plant Variety Protection Act – Full Text

World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) Headquarters (the Árpád Bogsch Building also known as the Main Building) in Geneva, Switzerland – Photo by Ville Oksanen from Finland

UNITED STATES PLANT VARIETY PROTECTION ACT

TITLE I – PLANT VARIETY PROTECTION OFFICE
Chapter Section
1. Organization and Publications . 1
2. Legal Provisions as to the Plant Variety Protection Office . 21
3. Plant Variety Protection Fees . 31

CHAPTER 1.-ORGANIZATION AND PUBLICATIONS
Section 1. Establishment.2
There is hereby established in the Department of Agriculture an office to be known as the Plant Variety Protection Office, which shall have the functions set forth in this Act. (7 U.S.C. 2321.)
Sec. 2. Seal.
The Plant Variety Protection Office shall have a seal with which documents and certificates evidencing plant variety protection shall be authenticated. (7 U.S.C. 2322.) Continue reading U.S. Plant Variety Protection Act — Full Text

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Clover Wine

  1. Add 3 quarts clover blossoms* to 4 quarts of boiling water removed from heat at point of boil. Let stand for three days.
  2. At the end of the third day, drain the juice into another container leaving the blossoms.
  3. Add three quarts of fresh water and the peel of one lemon to the blossoms and boil for fifteen minutes.
  4. Drain again and add this to the first container of juice.
  5. Add a pound of sugar to each quart of juice.
  6. Ferment with one cup of yeast. Keep in warm room for three weeks and then bottle.

* Blossoms are the flowers, not the leaves. A variety of clovers can be used. A conversation with a local farmer could be rewarding here. 

 

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USDA Plant Genome Research Project

In the October of 1990, the U.S. Department of Agriculture established the Plant Genome Research Program to “facilitate the improvement of plants—agronomic, horticultural, and forest species—by locating important genes and markers on chromosomes, determining the structure of those genes, and transferring the genes to improve performance.”

Strengthening Plant Genome Research Efforts-Goal of New USDA Program

Published in Probe Volume 1(1-2): Spring-Summer 1991 Continue reading USDA Plant Genome Research Project

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Vegetable Seed Growing as a Business

INTRODUCTION

The development in the United States of the art and industry of seed growing has all come within the past century, but its growth since about the time when the United States Department of Agriculture was organized as a separate branch of the Government has been so rapid that seed growing as a·distinct industry is now well worthy of the attention of all interested in American agriculture.  Previous to about 1862 there was comparatively little trade in garden seeds, and still less in farm seeds in this country.  Sales were practically limited to supplies for new farms and the planting of town gardens, and even the majority of town gardeners endeavored to save from year to year what seed they expected to need for their own planting.  There were then no great truck farms, each using vegetable seeds by the hundreds of pounds, such as are now very common. Continue reading Vegetable Seed Growing as a Business

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A Rare Bird and Hard to Find

Have an extra $7,700.00 in the bird bank?  

If so, this pair of binoculars may change the way you bird watch.  Caveat: Finding a pair for sale may prove rather difficult. Continue reading A Rare Bird and Hard to Find

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Fruits of the Empire: Licorice Root and Juice


Liquorice, the roots of Glycirrhiza Glabra, a perennial plant, a native of the south of Europe, but cultivated to some extent in England, particularly at Mitcham, in Surrey.

Its root, which is its only valuable part, is long, fibrous, of a yellow colour, and when fresh, very juicy. The liquorice root grows wild in many parts of Greece, and especially in the province of Achaia, at Corinth and Missolonghi, in great abundance; its quality is considered very good, and has induced many to undertake its manufacture. Large quantities are annually prepared for exportation. Continue reading Fruits of the Empire: Licorice Root and Juice

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Thomas Jefferson On Seed Saving and Sharing

The following are transcripts of two letters written by the Founding Father Thomas Jefferson on the subject of seed saving.

“November 27, 1818. Monticello. Thomas Jefferson to Henry E. Watkins, transmitting succory seed and outlining the culture of succory.” [Transcript]
Thomas Jefferson Correspondence Collection
Collection 89

Dear Sir,

Your fav[ou]r of the 6th. did not get to hand till the 23d. and I now with pleasure send you as much of the succory seed as can well go under the volume of a letter. as I mentioned to our colleagues at the Gap, I had forgotten which of them expressed a willingness to try this plant, and therefore I have waited for their application having taken care to have a plenty of seed saved. Continue reading Thomas Jefferson On Seed Saving and Sharing

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Muscadine Jelly


Muscadine Jelly
6 cups muscadine grape juice
6 cups sugar
1 box Kraft Sure Gel or Ball Fruit Jell Continue reading Muscadine Jelly

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